PDA

Afficher la version complète : Ubutnu 8.04 laptop-mode-tool et gnome power manager



Whadoon
13/05/2008, 21h50
Salut à tous,

J'aurais aimé savoir si le script laptop-mode-tool et gnome-power-manager, entre en conflit entre eux ?

J'ai configuré le script, mais il ne semble pas fonctionner au démarrage...

Whadoon
10/06/2008, 22h52
Bon, j'ai remarqué que lorsque le gnome-power-manager n'est pas charger en mémoire, il faut 2 à 3 pour qui mes options de sessions apparaisent lorsque j'appuie sur le boutton quitter (le bouton on-off :P) alors que le laptop-mode-tool est bien fonctionnel.

Est ce que quelqu'un sait m'aider pour que cela aille plus vite...

De plus, voici mon script et je voudrais savoir ce que vous en pensez:

Merci d'avance:

################################################## #############################
#
# Configuration for Laptop Mode Tools
# -----------------------------------
#
# There is a "system" to the configuration setting names:
# CONTROL_something=0/1 Determines whether Laptop Mode Tools controls
# something
# LM_something=value Value of "something" when laptop mode is active
# NOLM_something=value Value of "something" when laptop mode is NOT
# active
# AC_something=value Value of "something" when the computer is running
# on AC power
# BATT_something=value Value of "something when the computer is running
# on battery power
#
# There can be combinations of LM_/NOLM_ and AC_/BATT_ prefixes, but the
# available prefixes are different for each setting. The available ones are
# documented in the manual page, laptop-mode.conf(8). If there is no LM_/
# NOLM_ in a setting name, then the value is used independently of laptop
# mode state, and similarly, if there is no AC_/BATT_, then the value is used
# independently of power state.
#
# Some options only work on ACPI systems. They are marked ACPI-ONLY.
#
# Note that this configuration file is a fragment of bash shell script: you
# can use all the features of the bash scripting language to achieve your
# desired configuration.
#
#
# IMPORTANT: Laptop Mode Tools modules have separate configuration files, that
# can be found in /etc/laptop-mode/conf.d. Please look through these
# configuration files as well!
#
################################################## #############################



################################################## #############################
# Configuration debugging
# -----------------------
################################################## #############################


#
# Set this to 1 if you want to see a lot of information when you start/stop
# laptop_mode.
#
VERBOSE_OUTPUT=0



################################################## #############################
# When to enable laptop mode
# --------------------------
#
# "Laptop mode" is the mode in which laptop mode tools makes the computer
# consume less power. This includes the kernel "laptop_mode" feature, which
# allows your hard drives to spin down, as well as various other settings which
# can be tweaked by laptop mode tools. You can enable or disable all of these
# settings using the CONTROL_... options further down in this config file.
################################################## #############################


#
# Enable laptop mode when on battery power.
#
ENABLE_LAPTOP_MODE_ON_BATTERY=1


#
# Enable laptop mode when on AC power.
#
ENABLE_LAPTOP_MODE_ON_AC=1


#
# Enable laptop mode when the laptop's lid is closed, even when we're on AC
# power? (ACPI-ONLY)
#
ENABLE_LAPTOP_MODE_WHEN_LID_CLOSED=1



################################################## #############################
# When to enable data loss sensitive features
# -------------------------------------------
#
# When data loss sensitive features are disabled, laptop mode tools acts as if
# laptop mode were disabled, for those features only.
#
# Data loss sensitive features include:
# - laptop_mode (i.e., delayed writes)
# - hard drive write cache
#
# All of the options that follow can be set to 0 in ***** to prevent laptop
# mode tools from using them to stop data loss sensitive features. Use this
# when you have a battery that reports the wrong information, that confuses
# laptop mode tools.
#
# Disabling data loss sensitive features is ACPI-ONLY.
################################################## #############################


#
# Disable all data loss sensitive features when the battery level (in % of the
# battery capacity) reaches this value.
#
MINIMUM_BATTERY_CHARGE_PERCENT=3


#
# Disable data loss sensitive features when the battery reports its state
# as "critical".
#
DISABLE_LAPTOP_MODE_ON_CRITICAL_BATTERY_LEVEL=1


################################################## #############################
# Controlled hard drives and partitions
# -------------------------------------
#
# For spinning down your hard drives, laptop mode will remount file systems and
# adjust hard drive spindown timeouts. These parameters specify which
# devices and partitions are affected by laptop mode.
################################################## #############################


#
# The drives that laptop mode controls.
# Separate them by a space, e.g. HD="/dev/hda /dev/hdb". The default is a
# wildcard, which will get you all your IDE and SCSI/SATA drives.
#
HD="/dev/[hs]d[abcdefgh]"


#
# The partitions (or mount points) that laptop mode controls.
# Separate the values by spaces. Use "auto" to indicate all partitions on drives
# listed in HD. You can add things to "auto", e.g. "auto /dev/hdc3". You can
# also specify mount points, e.g. "/mnt/data".
#
PARTITIONS="auto /dev/mapper/*"


#
# If this is enabled, laptop mode tools will assume that SCSI drives are
# really SATA drives that only _look_ like SCSI drives, and will use hdparm
# to control them. Set this to 0 if you have /dev/sd devices and you want
# laptop mode tools to use the "sdparm" command to control them.
#
ASSUME_SCSI_IS_SATA=1


################################################## #############################
# Hard drive behaviour settings
# -----------------------------
#
# These settings specify how laptop mode tools will adjust the various
# parameters of your hard drives and file systems.
################################################## #############################


#
# Maximum time, in seconds, of work that you are prepared to lose when your
# system crashes or power runs out. This is the maximum time that Laptop Mode
# will keep unsaved data waiting in memory before spinning up your hard drive.
#
LM_BATT_MAX_LOST_WORK_SECONDS=1200
LM_AC_MAX_LOST_WORK_SECONDS=360


#
# Should laptop mode tools control readahead?
#
CONTROL_READAHEAD=1


#
# Read-ahead, in kilobytes. You can spin down the disk while playing MP3/OGG
# by setting the disk readahead to a reasonable size, e.g. 3072 (3 MB).
# Effectively, the disk will read a complete MP3 at once, and will then spin
# down while the MP3/OGG is playing. Don't set this too high, because the
# readahead is applied to _all_ files that are read from disk.
#
LM_READAHEAD=3072
NOLM_READAHEAD=128


#
# Should laptop mode tools add the "noatime" option to the mount options when
# laptop mode is enabled?
#
CONTROL_NOATIME=1


#
# Should laptop mode tools control the hard drive idle timeout settings?
#
CONTROL_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT=1


#
# Idle timeout values. (hdparm -S)
# Default is 2 hours on AC (NOLM_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=7200) and 20 seconds
# for battery and for AC with laptop mode on.
#
LM_AC_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=20
LM_BATT_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=20
NOLM_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=7200


#
# Should laptop mode tools control the hard drive power management settings?
#
CONTROL_HD_POWERMGMT=1


#
# Power management for HD (hdparm -B values)
#
BATT_HD_POWERMGMT=210
LM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=254
NOLM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=254


#
# Should laptop mode tools control the hard drive write cache settings?
#
CONTROL_HD_WRITECACHE=1


#
# Write cache settings for HD (hdparm -W values)
#
NOLM_AC_HD_WRITECACHE=1
NOLM_BATT_HD_WRITECACHE=0
LM_HD_WRITECACHE=0



################################################## #############################
# CPU frequency scaling and throttling
# ------------------------------------
#
# Laptop mode tools can automatically adjust your kernel CPU frequency
# settings. This includes upper and lower limits and scaling governors.
# There is also support for CPU throttling, on systems that don't support
# frequency scaling.
#
# This feature only works on 2.6 kernels.
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools control the maximum CPU frequency?
#
CONTROL_CPU_FREQUENCY=1


#
# Legal values are "slowest" for the slowest speed that your
# CPU is able to operate at, "fastest" for the fastest speed,
# "medium" for some value in the middle, or any value listed in
# /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cpufreq/scaling_available_frequencies.
# The "governor" can be any governor installed on your system, this usually
# includes "ondemand", "conservative", and "performance". The
# "IGNORE_NICE_LOAD" setting specifies that background programs that have
# a low priority ("nice level") should not cause the CPU frequency to
# be increased. (You generally want this to be enabled in battery mode.)
#
BATT_CPU_MAXFREQ=slowest
BATT_CPU_MINFREQ=slowest
BATT_CPU_GOVERNOR=powersave
BATT_CPU_IGNORE_NICE_LOAD=0
LM_AC_CPU_MAXFREQ=fastest
LM_AC_CPU_MINFREQ=slowest
LM_AC_CPU_GOVERNOR=ondemand
LM_AC_CPU_IGNORE_NICE_LOAD=0
NOLM_AC_CPU_MAXFREQ=fastest
NOLM_AC_CPU_MINFREQ=slowest
NOLM_AC_CPU_GOVERNOR=ondemand
NOLM_AC_CPU_IGNORE_NICE_LOAD=0


#
# Should laptop mode tools control the CPU throttling? This is only useful
# on processors that don't have frequency scaling.
# (Only works when you have /proc/acpi/processor/CPU*/throttling.)
#
CONTROL_CPU_THROTTLING=1


#
# Legal values are "maximum" for the maximum (slowest) throttling level,
# "minimum" for minimum (fastest) throttling level, "medium" for a value
# somewhere in the middle (this is usually 50% for P4s), or any value listed
# in /proc/acpi/processor/CPU*/throttling. Be careful when using "maximum":
# this may be _very_ slow (in fact, with P4s it slows down the processor
# by a factor 8).
#
BATT_CPU_THROTTLING=medium
LM_AC_CPU_THROTTLING=medium
NOLM_AC_CPU_THROTTLING=minimum



################################################## #############################
# Syslog configuration control
# ----------------------------
#
# Syslog daemons have a tendency to sync their log files when entries are
# written to them. This causes disks to spin up, which is not very nice when
# you're trying to save power. The syslog.conf can be tweaked to *not* sync
# a given file, by prepending the log file name with a dash, like this:
#
# mail.* -/var/log/mail/mail.log
#
# Using the following options, you can let laptop mode switch between
# different syslog configurations depending on whether you are working on
# battery or on AC power. To set this up, start by configuring these options
# for your syslog daemon, and then run lm-syslog-setup to create the various
# files. Then edit the laptop mode-specific syslog configuration files to
# remove the syncs only when laptop mode is active.
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools control which syslog.conf should be used?
#
CONTROL_SYSLOG_CONF=1


#
# Laptop mode tools controls syslog.conf by replacing /etc/syslog.conf (or
# whatever you specify in SYSLOG_CONF) by a link to the files configured here.
# NOTE: these files are NOT created by default, and if they do not
# exist this feature will not work. You can run the script
# /usr/sbin/lm-syslog-setup to set things up.
#
LM_AC_SYSLOG_CONF=/etc/syslog-on-ac-with-lm.conf
NOLM_AC_SYSLOG_CONF=/etc/syslog-on-ac-without-lm.conf
BATT_SYSLOG_CONF=/etc/syslog-on-battery.conf


#
# Signal this program when syslog.conf has been replaced.
#
SYSLOG_CONF_SIGNAL_PROGRAM=syslogd


#
# This is the syslog configuration file that should be replaced by a link to
# the other files.
#
SYSLOG_CONF=/etc/syslog.conf



################################################## #############################
# X display settings
# ------------------
#
# Using these settings, you can let laptop mode tools control the X display
# standby timeouts.
#
# This requires that you have installed the "xset" utility. It is part of the
# X.org server distribution and included in the package xorg-server-utils.
#
# The X settings are not automatically applied on login, and this is
# impossible fix for the user, since laptop mode tools must operate as root.
# Therefore, it is recommended to add the following line to /etc/X11/Xsession
# as well:
#
# /usr/sbin/laptop_mode force
#
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools control DPMS standby settings for X displays?
#
CONTROL_DPMS_STANDBY=1


#
# These settings specify the standby timeout for the X display,
# in seconds. The suspend and poweroff timeouts are somewhat
# larger values derived from these values.
#
BATT_DPMS_STANDBY=300
LM_AC_DPMS_STANDBY=1200
NOLM_AC_DPMS_STANDBY=1200



################################################## #############################
# Terminal settings
# -----------------
#
# Using these settings, you can let laptop mode tools control the terminal
# blanking timeouts. This only works for linux virtual consoles.
#
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools control terminal blanking settings?
#
CONTROL_TERMINAL=0


#
# Terminal device files that should be affected. (One terminal is enough, this
# affects all consoles. )
#
TERMINALS="/dev/tty1"


#
# These settings specify the blanking and powerdown timeouts. Note that
# the powerdown timeout is counted from the moment the screen is blanked,
# i.e. BLANK_MINUTES=2 and POWERDOWN_MINUTES=5 means the screen powers
# down after 7 minutes of inactivity. The range for all these settings is
# 1 to 60 minutes, or 0 to disable.
#
BATT_TERMINAL_BLANK_MINUTES=1
BATT_TERMINAL_POWERDOWN_MINUTES=2
LM_AC_TERMINAL_BLANK_MINUTES=10
LM_AC_TERMINAL_POWERDOWN_MINUTES=10
NOLM_AC_TERMINAL_BLANK_MINUTES=10
NOLM_AC_TERMINAL_POWERDOWN_MINUTES=50


################################################## #############################
# LCD brightness settings
# -----------------------
#
# Using these settings, you can make laptop mode tools automatically adjust
# your LCD's brightness settings. The settings are extremely simple -- they
# only allow for the execution of a command, nothing more. The reason for this
# is that LCD brightness settings are very different between laptop vendors.
#
# Suggestions for commands:
#
# * If your system has the file "/proc/acpi/video/VID/LCD/brightness" (VID may
# be VID1 or similar), use this file as BRIGHTNESS_OUTPUT, and use
# the command "echo <value>". The possible values can be listed using the
# command:
#
# cat /proc/acpi/video/VID/LCD/brightness
#
# * If you have a file /sys/class/backlight/.../brightness, then you can use
# that file as BRIGHTNESS_OUTPUT, and the command "echo <value>".
#
# As far as I understand it the values are between 0 and
# the value contained in the file /sys/class/backlight/.../max_brightness.
#
# * For Toshiba laptops, use the command "toshset" with the -lcd or -inten
# command. Read the toshset(1) manual page for more information on the
# parameters for this command. If you use this command, set
# BRIGHTNESS_OUTPUT to "/dev/null".
#
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools control LCD brightness?
#
CONTROL_BRIGHTNESS=1


#
# Commands to execute to set the brightness on your LCD
#
BATT_BRIGHTNESS_COMMAND="echo 20"
LM_AC_BRIGHTNESS_COMMAND="echo 60"
NOLM_AC_BRIGHTNESS_COMMAND="echo 60"
BRIGHTNESS_OUTPUT="/proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness"


################################################## #############################
# Auto-hibernation settings
# -------------------------
#
# Using these settings, you can make laptop mode tools automatically put your
# computer into hibernation when the battery level goes critically low.
#
# This feature only works on ACPI, and only works on computers whose batteries
# give off battery events often enough.
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode tools perform auto-hibernation?
#
ENABLE_AUTO_HIBERNATION=0


#
# The hibernation command that is to be executed when auto-hibernation
# is triggered.
#
HIBERNATE_COMMAND=/usr/sbin/hibernate


#
# Auto-hibernation battery level threshold, in percentage of the battery's
# total capacity.
#
AUTO_HIBERNATION_BATTERY_CHARGE_PERCENT=2


#
# Enable this to auto-hibernate if the battery reports that its level is
# "critical".
#
AUTO_HIBERNATION_ON_CRITICAL_BATTERY_LEVEL=1



################################################## #############################
# Start/Stop Programs settings
# ----------------------------
#
# Laptop mode tools can automatically start and stop programs when entering
# various power modes. Put scripts accepting "start" and "stop" parameters
# in the directories /etc/laptop-mode/batt-stop, batt-start, lm-ac-stop,
# lm-ac-start, nolm-ac-stop and nolm-ac-start. Laptop mode will call the
# scripts in a state-"stop" directory with the "stop" parameter when entering
# the state in question, and it will call the same scripts with the "start"
# parameter when leaving the state. Scripts in a state-"start" directory are
# called with the "start" parameter when the specified state is entered, and
# with the "stop" parameter when the specified state is left.
################################################## #############################


#
# Should laptop mode start and stop programs?
#
CONTROL_START_STOP=1



################################################## #############################
# Settings you probably don't want to touch
# -----------------------------------------
#
# It is usually not necessary to change these parameters. They are included
# for completeness' sake.
################################################## #############################


#
# Change mount options on partitions in PARTITIONS? You don't really want to
# disable this. If you do, then your hard drives will probably not spin down
# anymore.
#
CONTROL_MOUNT_OPTIONS=1


#
# Dirty synchronous ratio. At this percentage of dirty pages the process
# which calls write() does its own writeback.
#
LM_DIRTY_RATIO=60
NOLM_DIRTY_RATIO=40


#
# Allowed dirty background ratio, in percent. Once DIRTY_RATIO has been
# exceeded, the kernel will wake pdflush which will then reduce the amount
# of dirty memory to dirty_background_ratio. Set this nice and low, so once
# some writeout has commenced, we do a lot of it.
#
LM_DIRTY_BACKGROUND_RATIO=1
NOLM_DIRTY_BACKGROUND_RATIO=10


#
# kernel default settings -- don't touch these unless you know what you're
# doing.
#
DEF_UPDATE=5
DEF_XFS_AGE_BUFFER=15
DEF_XFS_SYNC_INTERVAL=30
DEF_XFS_BUFD_INTERVAL=1
DEF_MAX_AGE=30


#
# This must be adjusted manually to the value of HZ in the running kernel
# on 2.4, until the XFS people change their 2.4 external interfaces to work in
# centisecs. This can be automated, but it's a work in progress that still
# needs some fixes. On 2.6 kernels, XFS uses USER_HZ instead of HZ for
# external interfaces, and that is currently always set to 100. So you don't
# need to change this on 2.6.
#
XFS_HZ=100


#
# Seconds laptop mode has to to wait after the disk goes idle before doing
# a sync.
#
LM_SECONDS_BEFORE_SYNC=2